zondag 7 maart 2010

Research by dr Zeff: Highly Sensitive Men

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Results of Dr. Zeff’s research about highly sensitive boys based on in depth interviews with thirty highly sensitive men from five countries:
The North American (U.S. and Canada) HSMs (highly sensitive males) who reported that they had supportive parents as boys (indicated by at least one parent always being supportive of their sensitivity) and who played group sports as a boy were “never” or “rarely” teased for being sensitive.
However, the North American HSMs who reported that neither parents were supportive of their sensitivity, and who never played team sports as a boy were “usually,” or “always” teased by other children.

The research indicated that 85 percent of sensitive boys did not participate in team sports and reported that throughout their life they preferred to participate in individual exercise.

In my study I found that the more athletically inclined men had higher self-esteem than those HSMs who did not participate in team sports as a boy. The North American sensitive males in the study who regularly participated in team sports, regardless of their physique, were “never” or “rarely” teased.
The research indicated that 85 percent of HSMs “always” avoided fighting as a boy; with the remaining 15 percent responding that they “usually” avoided fighting. 90 percent of the HSMs did not like watching violence on television or in movies.

There are important cultural variations for HSBs growing up in different countries. The HSMs from India, Thailand and (most from) Denmark stated that they were “never” or “rarely” teased as a boy for their sensitivity regardless of the variables of supportive parents or participation in team sports.

The HSMs from Thailand and India indicated that they “usually” or “always” had many friends growing up, while virtually all of the HSMs who grew up in North America indicated that they had few if any friends. The exceptions were the North American HSBs who participated in team sports.

Regardless of the country where the HSB grew up, 75 percent indicated that they “usually” or “always” thought that there was something wrong with them during their childhood. Even some of the HSMs who reported that their parents supported their sensitivity and had positive peer interactions felt there was something wrong with them.

Over 90 percent of the HSMs felt that during their childhood they didn’t fit in with other boys.

All of the HSMs in my study indicated that throughout their life they “usually” or “always” have been: intuitive, gentle, responsible, a peacemaker and good at counseling people.

My research indicated that 94 percent of the HSMs in my survey are heterosexual, which approximately correlates with the percentage of heterosexual men in society.

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